June 6, 2020

Primary Care Practices Can Engage Patients in Virtual Care

AUTHORS


Kristina Mody
Senior Manager, Care Redesign

During the most challenging phases of the COVID-19 pandemic, one opportunity for the health care delivery system has been the rapid adoption of telehealth and virtual care by both primary care practices and patients. The Pacific Business Group on Health’s California Quality Collaborative (CQC) has hosted webinars to support and spread successful practices in virtual care for independent primary care practices and IPAs as they rapidly implemented telehealth technology and workflows.

Nationally, the trends reflect widespread virtual care adoption.  By one May 2020 analysis, telehealth visits in the US increased 300-fold in March and April 2020 compared to the same time period in 2019 (Epic Health Research Network).  Providers have been pleased with their telehealth experience, and patients have too: 88% of patients new to telehealth said they would like to use it again (PwC Health Research Institute).  The health system is eager to build on the implementation gains around virtual care made during the public health emergency, especially its ability to improve access to care and reduce costs.

Patient engagement in virtual care

Yet today, more than ever, it’s essential for health care clinicians and care teams to ensure that virtual care being provided is as patient-centered as possible. This topic was the focus of a May 6 webinar hosted by CQC, which highlighted presentations from a number of experts including Dr. Courtney Lyles, Associate Professor, Center for Vulnerable Populations at UCSF; Libby Hoy, Founder & CEO, PFCC partners; and Dr. Fiona Wilson, former Teladoc provider and current Supervising Clinician Specialist, Workers Compensation Division, Department of Human Resources, City & County of San Francisco.

Dr. Lyles shared examples from decades-long research done around patient portals, telephone visits and tactics that help bridge the “digital divide,” even in regions of strong technology adoption, such as the Bay Area. Her advice was not to make any assumptions about what patients do or do not have access to, and establish ongoing trainings, where patients can be assured to get continuous support for the virtual care they are seeking.

Libby Hoy of PFCC partners shared lessons from her organization’s history building patient advisory capacity. She cautioned that the work, especially at this time, is messy, but reminded care teams and providers that involving patients in the design process of the workflows results in more effective care.

Dr. Wilson shared her experience as a telehealth provider during COVID-19 for Teladoc, an organization that provides virtual care for patients all over the United States. Her advice for clinicians was to be an empathetic and engaged listener to patients when they are sharing their health issues, and make sure to ask about non-medical needs that may be even more present today, such as social isolation and economic hardship.

What providers can do now

Today, primary care practices are regrouping after shelter-in-place restrictions lift, adapting to a hybrid of virtual and in-person care, and working to address any care needs of their patients that were deferred during the height of epidemic. Yet even in this time of transition, CQC’s expert panelists shared the following steps practices can take to focus on patient needs:

  • Always ask patients their preferences. Ask what technology they have access to, and what makes them comfortable. Make sure your visit builds on your relationship, addresses what device they are using and that you ask how you can be of help during this process.
  • Look to your patients and families as resources to designing your telehealth programs. Outside even the visit, consider implementing patient open-ended surveys, focus groups, telephone calls or advisory programs. Tap into the people with the least experience to help you improve your work.
  • Make workflows as simple as you can. Technology can be part of the barrier, but at the same time, almost everyone has a phone. Start with the tools that you and patients have. You don’t need a smart phone to conduct these visits.

Access CQC’s May 29 webinar recording and summary here.

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